Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies

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Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies Graduate Students

Preston Atwood

Hebrew Bible

Preston entered the Hebrew Bible & Semitic Studies program in the fall of 2014. He earned his BA in Humanities at Scarborough College, both his MDiv (with concentrations in Philosophy of Religion and Theology) and ThM (Old Testament/Hebrew Bible) at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, and his MA (Hebrew Bible & Semitic Studies) at UW-Madison. Additionally, he has taken advanced LXX courses at Trinity Western University in Langley, BC (Summers 2014, 2016), and served as a Visiting Research Fellow at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel during Summer 2018. He is currently a fellow of two fellowships programs: the George L. Mosse Exchange Program and the Mellon-Wisconsin Dissertation Program. Employing the theory of Indirect Translation (ITr) and methodological developments in Descriptive Translation Studies (DTR), Preston’s dissertation explores the role of LXX Isaiah in the translation of the Peshitta of Isaiah. His research foci include textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible, Septuagint and Peshitta studies, Translation Studies (DTS; ITr; Systems Theory), Second Temple Judaism, early Jewish-Christian relations, the Book of Isaiah, Palmyrene Aramaic Epigraphy, and the NW Semitic languages.

Olivia Baquerizo

Classics

Brian Brannon

Classics

Brian received his B.A. in Classics from the University of Texas at Austin in the spring of 2017 with departmental honors and subsequently joined the University of Wisconsin at Madison’s Classics program the following fall.  He is interested in the cultural practices of the ancient world – particularly ancient Greece – as well as its varying attitudes regarding sexuality, philosophy, and poetry.

Jordan Brown

Hebrew Bible

Jordan received a B.A. in Biblical and Theological Studies from Crown College (St. Bonifacius, MN), an M.A. in Biblical Exegesis at Wheaton College (Wheaton, IL), and an M.A. in Biblical and Near Eastern Archaeology and Languages from Trinity International University (Deerfield, IL). He is fascinated with how the language and culture of the ancient Near East can serve as a lens to understand the Hebrew Bible. Within this realm, he has specific interest in mythic literature, cultic rituals, magic, and Northwest Semitic languages.

Elizabeth Currier

Hebrew Bible

Mary Clare Dolinar

Classics

Amie Goblirsch

Classics

Amie received her B.A. in Classics (with honors) from Gustavus Adolphus College in 2016 and her M.A. in Classics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2018. Her research interests are focused on the art, architecture, and archaeology of the classical world and concentrate especially on East Greek architecture, construction techniques and technologies, and interrelations between Greece and the Near East. At UW, Amie has taught courses in Classical Mythology, Greek civilization, and Western Literature and Art.

Jessica Greene

Classics

Molly Harris

Classics

Molly is a Ph.D. candidate in the Classics program. She earned her B.A. in Classical Languages and Literature from the University of Michigan (2012) and her M.A. in Classics from UW-Madison (2014). Her dissertation focuses on the aftermath of war within Greek tragedy, particularly the way that tragedy exposes the extensive and negative effects of war on households and communities. Molly’s research has also included work on the ambiguities of sound and language in Euripides’ Alcestis; the characterization of individuals and groups in Thucydides; approaches to civil war and clementia in Cicero’s Caesarian speeches and letters; and representations of war trauma in Homer and Greek tragedy. Molly has presented at professional conferences, including the CAMWS annual meeting (2014, accepted for 2017) and the Heartland Graduate Workshop (2015). She also continues to pursue her interests in teaching and the public humanities. She is a Future Faculty Partner and member of the UW Teaching Academy’s Executive Committee and has interned with the National Endowment for the Humanities in Washington, D.C. In collaboration with the Wisconsin Veterans Museum in Madison, Molly currently leads a local reading group of ancient and modern war literature, a project supported by the Public Humanities Exchange at UW-Madison’s Center for the Humanities. Within CANES, Molly has taught introductory and intermediate Latin courses, Greek Civilization, Classical Mythology, and Ancient Religions of the Mediterranean. She has also taught related classes in Integrated Liberal Studies and the Summer Collegiate Experience. Molly enjoys running and playing horn in community and UW concert bands.

Patrick Harvey

Hebrew Bible

Born and raised near Muscle Shoals, Alabama and thereafter migrating to East Tennessee, Patrick received his B.S. in Biblical Studies at Johnson University (2012), he received his M.A. in Hebrew Bible at Emmanuel School of Religion (2016) with cooperative study at East Tennessee State University in Classical Languages (2015-2016), and he began his studies at UW in the Fall of 2017. His research interests include the intersection of historiography of the ancient Near East and the Greco-Roman period, Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible (primarily by means of the LXX, Vulgate, Vetus Latina, and Josephus), and various forms of Literary Criticism of the Post-Structuralist variety. In his spare time, he enjoys playing electric blues guitar, fishing, and a nice smoke of Sugar Mt. tobacco from his pipe.

Amy Hendricks

Classics

Amy is a Ph.D. candidate in the Classics program. Amy earned her B.A. in Greek and Roman Studies (with honors) and English Literature from Rhodes College (2014) and her M.A. in Classics from UW-Madison (2016). Her dissertation focuses on the role of choruses in archaic and classical Greek poetry, particularly in the ways that choruses act as a bridge between different time periods and poetic genres. Amy’s research has also explored the relationship of Sapphic poetry to the epic tradition through the figure of Helen, as well as the various methods of allusion that occur throughout the works of Vergil. Within the CANES department, Amy has taught Elementary Latin, The Greeks (a Comm-B writing intensive course), The Romans, Classical Mythology, and Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World. She has also served as a Mellon Morgridge Graduate Fellow and is a 2018 College of Letters and Science Teaching Fellow.

Mason Johnson

Classics

Mason received his B.A. in both Philosophy and Greek & Roman Studies (with honors) from Rhodes College in 2015 and his MA in Classics from the University of Wisconsin - Madison in 2017. His Master's thesis argues for the possibility of a rational political science in Cicero's De Re Publica using his literary correspondence as well as arguing for the influence and use of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics in this work.  His research interests lie in ancient philosophy and its literary treatments, particularly in its reception and use by Roman authors, as well as in classical reception and modern philosophy and critical theory as it applies to ancient texts. Mason has taught courses in introductory Latin, Roman civilization, and an introduction to Western Civilization.

Jesse Kisman

Hebrew Bible

Hikaru Kumon

Hebrew Bible

Hikaru entered the Hebrew Bible program in 2014. He has earned his BA in Engineering from Tsukuba University, and a BA and MA in Theology from Tokyo Christian University. Entering the Hebrew Bible program at UW-Madison in 2014, he has earned his MA there in 2016, and has continued on to the PhD program. During 2017-2018, he spent a year at Hebrew University of Jerusalem as a Visiting Research Fellow. Hikaru’s dissertation seeks to apply a theory in Lexicography, the Natural Semantic Metalanguage, to Hebrew Lexicography. The dissertation focuses particularly on key lexemes in Ecclesiastes. His interest is in Northwest Semitic Linguistics, particularly Phonology and Semantics.

Mary Claire LaVelle

Classics

MC received her B.A. in Greek, Latin, and Classical Civilization in 2014 from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.  Her interests include the study of ancient and modern languages, classical mythology, literature, gender studies, classical reception and ancient religion.

Ximing Lu

Classics

Katherine Melberg

Classics

Rebecca Moorman

Classics

Rebecca is a PhD candidate in the Classics program and current Mellon-Morgridge Graduate Fellow (2018-2019). Her dissertation considers the role of the senses and synaesthesia within the corpora of Apuleius, Persius, and Lucretius. Rebecca's general research interests include Imperial Latin literature, Roman prose fiction, critical theory, ancient gender and sexuality, and historiography. Her past research has explored the role of temporal distance and sociopolitical influence on biographer and historian depictions of Julius Caesar, the use of gustatory and alimentary imagery in Greek literature, and female capacity for virtue and education in Plutarch. A recipient of the campus-wide Early Excellence in Teaching Award (2016), Rebecca is passionate about undergraduate pedagogy. Within the CANES department, she has taught Elementary and Intermediate Latin courses, Classical Mythology, and The Greeks (a Comm-B or writing focused course). Rebecca holds an MA in Classics from UW-Madison and a BA in Classical Languages (summa cum laude) from Macalester College.

Samson Olanrewaju

Hebrew Bible

Jesse Pruett

Hebrew Bible

Jesse is a graduate student in the Hebrew Bible wing of the CANES Department. Prior to attending UW, he earned his BA in Biblical Studies/Biblical Languages from Ouachita Baptist University, his MA in Biblical Exegesis from Wheaton College, and his MA in Jewish Studies from Hebrew Union College. Jesse is particularly interested in the historical and socio-linguistic analysis of biblical texts, especially those associated with the Deuteronomic History, a topic he hopes to pursue for dissertation research. In addition to work with biblical texts, Jesse has also been a part of UW's analysis of Palmyrene epigraphic material, serving as a project assistant to the Wisconsin Palmyrene Aramaic Inscriptions Project (WPAIP).

 

Rian Sirkus

Classics

Rian Sirkus entered the Classics PhD Program in the fall of 2017. He earned his MA in Classics from the University of Maryland, College Park (2014), a Post-Baccalaureate in Classics from Georgetown University (2012), and a BA in History from Cornell University (2010). His interests lie primarily in Greek and Roman Historiography, Greek Lyric, Silver Latin Epic, and Indo-European Morphology.